Posts Tagged ‘original content’

10 Ways to Communicate Badly with Developers

Monday, October 18th, 2010

Are you a boss, owner, client, or colleague who really wants to waste a major portion of my development work day, break down the team concept, bring productivity to a complete halt, or just piss me off — but you’re having difficulties finding exactly how to go about it? To assist you in being more inefficient, here are the top ten ways in which you can communicate badly. (more…)

Video: Demo of Google AppEngine and AppEngineJS

Thursday, October 7th, 2010

Eugene Lazutkin gives a demonstration of Google AppEngine and AppEngineJS application cycle:
* Going over the code of a simple application
* Google AppEngine SDK
* Management

See the video here.

HTML5 Video Mysteries Explained

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

There can be a cloud of mystery surrounding new technologies. HTML5 Video is especially problematic since it is not just one technology, there are multiple codecs and file formats. When is a good time to adopt? Is it possible that you can adopt too late or too soon?

In this IBM developerWorks article, I show the progression of the early days of the Internet and choppy, “cross your fingers and hope it works” digital video to its current state of the browser vendors attempting to reclaim native video from the Adobe Flash plugin.

The idea behind HTML5 Video was simplicity… but the current result is not so simple. This article defines some of the difficult video terminology to make it easier to understand how it works, so that you can look at today’s fragmented situation and still make the best decisions for you or your company.

I’m also quite honored to have had my blog voted as best article of the week, and displayed prominently on the Web Development front page.

Article: Introduction to HTML5 Video

You may also be interested in the video and the presentation upon which this article was based.

JavaScript – It’s a Real Language!

Friday, October 1st, 2010

JavaScript doesn’t get much respect. “It’s a toy!”, they say. The language has been around ever since the earliest browsers.  But did you know JavaScript is a real language? It seems that only front end developers realize that it is!  Where is the confusion?  You have to look at the language’s origins.  Traditionally, JavaScript has always been part of the browser.   This absolutely has contributed to the popularity it enjoys today, but has also mischaracterized it as a toy for browsers.  It has simply been used as the means to get the cool things done you can’t do with HTML alone.

JavaScript - It's a Real Language!

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JavaScript Console Fix V2 Now with iOS!

Monday, September 13th, 2010

The consoleFix.js has been a popular script, helping people overcome problems in the various browsers, but now, there are more features including support for your iPhone.  consoleFix is a small JavaScript file that removes the annoyances of cross browser logging. The use of console.log is now a standard used by not only Firebug, but WebKit Inspector and Internet Explorer Developer Tools. Firebug is ubiquitous with front end web development, and while it provides dozens of tools like DOM inspection and network sniffing, the logger gets the vast majority of use.

While log, warn, and info may be standard, using the groupCollapsed method will throw an error in Chrome, and the seemingly innocuous debug will throw an error in IE. Opera’s Dragonfly is an improvement over it’s anemic predecessor, but it still rivals IE’s feeble text-only logger and thus, only supports a small subset of console methods.

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Plain Text vs innerText vs textContent

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

innerText and textContent are properties that get or set the text of an element or all its children. Internet Explorer implemented innerText in version 4.0, and it’s a useful, if misunderstood feature. WebKit also has innerText, carefully copying from, and even improving upon IE; and additionally has the standards compliant textContent, which we shall see, is no where near as useful and is in fact quite different. Firefox has textContent but not innerText, and a common mistake is writing code that retrieves one or the other, assuming the result will be the same (it’s not). Opera has the property, but it is little more than an alias of textContent, which to me is analogous to false advertising.
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Internet Explorer 6 – Stop Enabling Yesterday’s Browser

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

Internet Explorer 6 in its heyday was a great browser. It raised the bar so high, it stood alone; the other browsers languished in its wake. It had the backing of Microsoft to the tune of $100 million a year in the late 1990’s. IE6 became the darling of enterprise website development using it as the standard to which they would develop. IE hit a peak usage share of around 95% during 2002, 2003.  But that is yesterday’s technology, it is time to move on. (more…)

Anatomy of Bad User Experience

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

It’s amazing that in this day of age, with all information, history, and expertise we have in building websites, that any company could churn out something so patently unusable. The following rant is a true story, experienced while reading one of my favorite bloggers on a major website…

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Apple Rumored to Move to New Video Codec

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

A few weeks ago I gave a presentation on HTML5 Video, and suggested that Apple may be the new evil empire for getting the world hooked on the H264 MPEG codec, and then collect massive royalties a few years later.

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Why Your Company Needs A Front End Developer

Sunday, July 25th, 2010

Business often places most, if not all, of their development efforts on the server side.  As companies start a development project, focus is usually given to the data that supports their idea, its security, and the business logic. The problem is, this strategy misses the holistic approach that a front end developer offers. The front end guy is often considered the guy who “makes things pretty”. While this description is based on a kernel of truth, it’s more of a stereotype. It’s about as accurate as describing the server-dev as the guy who just “serves data”.

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