Archive for the ‘browsers’ Category

Web App or Web Site?

Monday, June 4th, 2012

When Twitter went to an all-AJAX UI, I cheered that, especially the first real use of AJAX SEO, but I also questioned it. As a front end developer it was great for me to point to as an example of what could be done now and in the future. But I honestly didn’t understand why Twitter did that, since I don’t see Twitter as a web application — it’s content, like a newspaper, and really should be delivered by server.


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A Dear John Letter to Firefox

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Dear Firefox Letter
Dear Firefox,

We met when you were 1.5, and started dating when you were 2.0. We enjoyed making fun of my clueless ex, Internet Explorer. IE seemed great at the time, but you showed me the error of my ways. IE was selfish and wanted to do everything its own way. You truly believed in collaboration and gratefully accepted suggestions. When you brought Firebug to the party, I became deeply committed to our relationship. Before Firebug I had no idea how difficult my life was, or the abuse of “error on line 0 character 0″; or blank, failed, pages and the silent treatment. You were very up-front with my errors, and kept life spicy with tabs, smart bookmarks, and an Awesome Bar that was truly awesome. Sure you didn’t load pages as fast as the other browsers, but I’m not greedy and the most important thing in my life was never… “cache”. Life was never boring, and at the nearest hint that it was, you would whisper in my ear, “I have a new AddOn…” And boy oh boy, I’ll never forget the first night with that Greasemonkey.
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Google Dart – Should JavaScript be Replaced?

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

A memo from a Google employee was leaked earlier this month exposing the new plan for Dart, which they claim to be a new programming language for structured web programming. The memo goes into some detail on what Dart would be, but doesn’t go into much detail on why Dart should be. In other words, it doesn’t explicitly state the deficiencies in JavaScript. Do they have a point? Should JavaScript be replaced?

Dart to replace JavaScript?
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IE9 HTML5 Tests 99%… BOGUS

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011


I’m really getting sick of reading how “HTML5 compliant” IE9 is. The IE team keeps pushing their testing chart that shows it passes 99% of the tests while the competitor browsers are no where close.

99% is a load of crap. It’s not close to that.

I stumbled upon this fact because I had just created a new HTML5 Uploader for Dojo (I’ll post a blog on that soon). So naturally, since IE9 is 99% HTML5 compliant it supports multiple file uploads right?
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HTML5 is Dead

Thursday, January 20th, 2011

html5 is dead
You read that right. One day after the W3C’s earth-shaking announcement to brand HTML5 with a new logo… The WHATWG announces that HTML5 will no longer exist. Hey, Ian Hickson says that the WHATWG works closely with the W3C — but now I have to wonder. (more…)

The Impact of Chrome Dropping the H.264 Codec

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

This is an excerpt from my article on BetterVideo:

Chrome recently made the announcement that they will soon discontinue support for the H.264 video codec. While end users may not care, nor should they notice, to video producers this is significant, because supporting multiple codecs means higher costs and longer development.
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JavaScript Console Fix V2 Now with iOS!

Monday, September 13th, 2010

The consoleFix.js has been a popular script, helping people overcome problems in the various browsers, but now, there are more features including support for your iPhone.  consoleFix is a small JavaScript file that removes the annoyances of cross browser logging. The use of console.log is now a standard used by not only Firebug, but WebKit Inspector and Internet Explorer Developer Tools. Firebug is ubiquitous with front end web development, and while it provides dozens of tools like DOM inspection and network sniffing, the logger gets the vast majority of use.

While log, warn, and info may be standard, using the groupCollapsed method will throw an error in Chrome, and the seemingly innocuous debug will throw an error in IE. Opera’s Dragonfly is an improvement over it’s anemic predecessor, but it still rivals IE’s feeble text-only logger and thus, only supports a small subset of console methods.

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Plain Text vs innerText vs textContent

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

innerText and textContent are properties that get or set the text of an element or all its children. Internet Explorer implemented innerText in version 4.0, and it’s a useful, if misunderstood feature. WebKit also has innerText, carefully copying from, and even improving upon IE; and additionally has the standards compliant textContent, which we shall see, is no where near as useful and is in fact quite different. Firefox has textContent but not innerText, and a common mistake is writing code that retrieves one or the other, assuming the result will be the same (it’s not). Opera has the property, but it is little more than an alias of textContent, which to me is analogous to false advertising.
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Internet Explorer 6 – Stop Enabling Yesterday’s Browser

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

Internet Explorer 6 in its heyday was a great browser. It raised the bar so high, it stood alone; the other browsers languished in its wake. It had the backing of Microsoft to the tune of $100 million a year in the late 1990′s. IE6 became the darling of enterprise website development using it as the standard to which they would develop. IE hit a peak usage share of around 95% during 2002, 2003.  But that is yesterday’s technology, it is time to move on. (more…)

Apple Rumored to Move to New Video Codec

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

A few weeks ago I gave a presentation on HTML5 Video, and suggested that Apple may be the new evil empire for getting the world hooked on the H264 MPEG codec, and then collect massive royalties a few years later.

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